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United Airlines Flight 389 was a scheduled flight from LaGuardia Airport, New York City, New York, to O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois. On August 16, 1965, at approximately 21:21 EST, the Boeing 727 crashed into Lake Michigan 20 miles east of Fort Sheridan, near Lake Forest, while descending from 35,000 feet mean sea level . All 30 people on board perished, including Clarence "Clancy" Sayen, the former president of the Air Line Pilots Association. There was no indication of any unusual problem prior to impact.

United Airlines Flight 389
Boeing 727-22, United Airlines AN0224285.jpg
A stored United 727 identical to the aircraft involved
Accident summary
Date August 16, 1965
Summary CFIT, Pilot error
Site Lake Michigan, United States
42°15′2″N 87°27′56″W / 42.25056°N 87.46556°W / 42.25056; -87.46556Coordinates: 42°15′2″N 87°27′56″W / 42.25056°N 87.46556°W / 42.25056; -87.46556
Passengers 24
Crew 6
Fatalities 30
Injuries (non-fatal) 0
Survivors 0
Aircraft type Boeing 727-22
Operator United Airlines
Registration N7036U
Flight origin LaGuardia Airport, New York City, New York
Destination O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois

United Airlines Flight 389 was a scheduled flight from LaGuardia Airport, New York City, New York, to O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois. On August 16, 1965, at approximately 21:21 EST, the Boeing 727 crashed into Lake Michigan 20 miles (32 km) east of Fort Sheridan, near Lake Forest, while descending from 35,000 feet mean sea level (MSL). All 30 people on board perished, including Clarence "Clancy" Sayen, the former president of the Air Line Pilots Association. There was no indication of any unusual problem prior to impact.

A definitive cause was not determined by National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigators. However, it was believed that the crash was most likely the result of the pilots misreading their three-pointer (3p) altimeters by 10,000 feet.

At the time of the accident, United Airlines had 39 other 727s in the fleet (of the 247 Boeing 727s ordered), all of which were 727-100 (727-22).