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Tufts University is a private research university incorporated in the municipality of Medford, Massachusetts. Tufts College was founded in 1852 by Christian Universalists who worked for years to open a non-sectarian institution of higher learning. Charles Tufts donated the land for the campus on Walnut Hill, the highest point in Medford, saying that he wanted to set a "light on the hill." The name was changed to Tufts University in 1954, although the corporate name remains "the Trustees of Tufts College." For more than a century, Tufts was a small New England liberal arts college. The French American nutritionist and former professor at the Harvard School of Public Health Jean Mayer became president of Tufts in the late 1970s and, through a series of rapid acquisitions, transformed the school into a larger research university.

Tufts University
Tufts official seal.svg
Latin: Universitas Tuftensis
Former names
Tufts College
(1852–1954)
Motto Pax et Lux (Latin)
Motto in English
Peace and Light
Type Private non-profit
Established 1852
Endowment $1.593 billion (2015)
Chairman Peter R. Dolan
President Anthony P. Monaco
Provost David R. Harris
Academic staff
1,423 (fall 2015; full-time)
Students 10,659 (fall 2015)
Undergraduates 5,216 (fall 2015)
Postgraduates 5,443 (fall 2015)
Location Medford, Massachusetts, U.S.
42°24′22″N 71°07′12″W / 42.406°N 71.120°W / 42.406; -71.120Coordinates: 42°24′22″N 71°07′12″W / 42.406°N 71.120°W / 42.406; -71.120
Campus Urban, total 150 acres (0.61 km)
Student newspaper The Tufts Daily
Colors Tufts Blue and brown
         
Athletics NCAA Division III – NESCAC
Nickname Jumbos
Mascot Jumbo the Elephant
Affiliations URA
AICUM
NAICU
UPNE
APSIA
Website www.tufts.edu
Tufts University wordmark.svg

Tufts University is a private research university incorporated in the municipality of Medford, Massachusetts. Tufts College was founded in 1852 by Christian Universalists who worked for years to open a non-sectarian institution of higher learning. Charles Tufts donated the land for the campus on Walnut Hill, the highest point in Medford, saying that he wanted to set a "light on the hill." The name was changed to Tufts University in 1954, although the corporate name remains "the Trustees of Tufts College." For more than a century, Tufts was a small New England liberal arts college. The French American nutritionist and former professor at the Harvard School of Public Health Jean Mayer became president of Tufts in the late 1970s and, through a series of rapid acquisitions, transformed the school into a larger research university.

The university is organized into ten schools, including two undergraduate degree programs and eight graduate divisions, on four campuses in Massachusetts and the French Alps. The university emphasizes active citizenship and public service in all of its disciplines and is known for its internationalism and study abroad programs. Among its schools is the United States' oldest graduate school of international relations, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. The School of the Museum of Fine Arts offers art programs affiliated with a major museum, the Museum of Fine Arts. The University offers joint undergraduate degree programs with the New England Conservatory, and the Sciences Po Paris with additional programs with the University of Paris, University of Oxford and constituents of the University of London. Some of its programs have affiliations with nearby institutions Harvard and MIT.

Tufts is a charter member of and athletically competes in the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC). Tufts accepted 14% of undergraduate applicants to the Class of 2020 from a pool of 20,223. It is consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report and Forbes as the third best university in Massachusetts after Harvard and MIT and one of the top schools in the U.S.