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Transcript - NPR

The Southern Agrarians were a group of twelve American writers, poets, essayists, and novelists, all with roots in the Southern United States, who joined together to write a pro-Southern agrarian manifesto, a collection of essays published in 1930 titled I'll Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition. They were major contributors to the revival of Southern literature in the 1920s and 1930s now known as the Southern Renaissance.

The Southern Agrarians (also known as the Twelve Southerners, the Vanderbilt Agrarians, the Nashville Agrarians, the Tennessee Agrarians, or the Fugitive Agrarians) were a group of twelve American writers, poets, essayists, and novelists, all with roots in the Southern United States, who joined together to write a pro-Southern agrarian manifesto, a collection of essays published in 1930 titled I'll Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition. They were major contributors to the revival of Southern literature in the 1920s and 1930s now known as the Southern Renaissance.

The Southern Agrarians were based at Vanderbilt University in Nashville and its unofficial leader was John Crowe Ransom.