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Shaivism or Śaivism , also known as Shivaism and Saivam , is one of the major branches of Sanathan Dharma , revering Shiva as the Supreme Being. Shiva is sometimes depicted as the fierce god Bhairava. Followers of Shaivam are called "Shaivas", "Saivas", "Shaivites", or "Saivarkal". They believe that Shiva is All and in all, the creator, preserver, destroyer, revealer and concealer of all that is. Shaivism, like some of the other forms of Hinduism, spread to other parts of Southeast Asia, including Java, Bali, and parts of the Southeast Asian continent, including Cambodia.

Shaivism or Śaivism (Sanskrit: शैव पंथ, Śaiva Paṁtha,  "Shiva's Path"), also known as Shivaism (Nepali: शिव पथ) and Saivam (Tamil: சைவம்), is one of the major branches of Sanathan Dharma (Hinduism), revering Shiva as the Supreme Being. Shiva is sometimes depicted as the fierce god Bhairava. Followers of Shaivam are called "Shaivas", "Saivas", "Shaivites", or "Saivarkal". They believe that Shiva is All and in all, the creator, preserver, destroyer, revealer and concealer of all that is. Shaivism, like some of the other forms of Hinduism, spread to other parts of Southeast Asia, including Java, Bali, and parts of the Southeast Asian continent, including Cambodia.

Saivists are more attracted to asceticism than adherents of other Hindu sects and may be found wandering in Nepal and India with ashen faces performing self-purification rituals. They worship in the temple and practise yoga, striving to be one with Shiva within. Within Hinduism an estimated 252 million or 26.6% followers are Shaivites.