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Neoconservatism is a political movement born in the United States during the 1960s among conservative leaning Democrats who became disenchanted with the party's foreign policy. Many of its adherents became politically famous during the Republican presidential administrations of the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. Neoconservatives peaked in influence during the administration of George W. Bush, when they played a major role in promoting and planning the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Prominent neoconservatives in the George W. Bush administration included Paul Wolfowitz, John Bolton, Elliott Abrams, Richard Perle and Paul Bremer. Senior officials Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, while not identifying as neoconservatives, listened closely to neoconservative advisers regarding foreign policy, especially the defense of Israel and the promotion of democracy in the Middle East.

For modern conservatism in other countries, see Conservatism § Modern conservatism in different countries.

Neoconservatism (commonly shortened to neocon) is a political movement born in the United States during the 1960s among conservative leaning Democrats who became disenchanted with the party's foreign policy. Many of its adherents became politically famous during the Republican presidential administrations of the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. Neoconservatives peaked in influence during the administration of George W. Bush, when they played a major role in promoting and planning the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Prominent neoconservatives in the George W. Bush administration included Paul Wolfowitz, John Bolton, Elliott Abrams, Richard Perle and Paul Bremer. Senior officials Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, while not identifying as neoconservatives, listened closely to neoconservative advisers regarding foreign policy, especially the defense of Israel and the promotion of democracy in the Middle East.

The term "neoconservative" refers to those who made the ideological journey from the anti-Stalinist Left to the camp of American conservatism. Neoconservatives typically advocate the promotion of democracy and promotion of American national interest in international affairs, including by means of military force and are known for espousing disdain for communism and for political radicalism. The movement had its intellectual roots in the Jewish monthly review magazine Commentary, published by the American Jewish Committee. They spoke out against the New Left and in that way helped define the movement. C. Bradley Thompson, a professor at Clemson University, claims that most influential neoconservatives refer explicitly to the theoretical ideas in the philosophy of Leo Strauss (1899–1973),

though in doing so they may draw upon meaning that Strauss himself did not endorse.

Neoconservatism: The Biography of a Movement

The Neoconservative Agenda | John F. McManus

John F. McManus, President of The John Birch Society, exposes the history and agenda of the Neoconservative movement. Filmed on May 2, 2005 at the ...

Jim Lobe: Neoconservatism in a Nutshell

Full speech at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tioed5gpY_c Review of the rise of neoconservatives, their role in promoting the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and the ...

Neoconservatism - Words of the World

Maria Ryan from the University of Nottingham discusses the origins of Neoconservatism and its long-lasting influence. This video was filmed and edited by Sean ...

Ex-Neocon: A Refugee from Neoconservatism on His Departure

Scott McConnell was once editorial page editor of the New York Post, and worked and published in neoconservative circles. Then something changed, and he ...

Highlights: Jim Lobe on Neoconservatism

Full speech at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tioed5gpY_c Review of the rise of neoconservatives, their role in promoting the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and the ...