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The Government of the French Republic exercises executive power. It is composed of a prime minister, who is the head of government, and both junior and senior ministers. Senior ministers are titled as Ministers , whereas junior ministers are titled as Secretaries of State . A smaller and more powerful executive body, called the Council of Ministers , is composed only of the senior ministers, though some Secretaries of State may attend Council meetings. The Council of Ministers is chaired by the President of the Republic, unlike the government, but is still led by the Prime Minister, who was officially titled as the President of the Council of Ministers during the Third and Fourth Republics. By comparison, the Government of France is equivalent to Her Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom, whereas the Council of Ministers is equivalent to the Cabinet of the United Kingdom.

French: Gouvernement de la République française
French government logo.svg
Overview
Established 1958 (Fifth Republic)
State French Republic
Leader Prime Minister
Appointed by President of the Republic
Main organ Council of Ministers
Responsible to National Assembly
Headquarters Hôtel Matignon
Paris
Website #

The Government of the French Republic (French: Gouvernement de la République française) exercises executive power. It is composed of a prime minister, who is the head of government, and both junior and senior ministers. Senior ministers are titled as Ministers (French: Ministres), whereas junior ministers are titled as Secretaries of State (French: Secrétaires d'État). A smaller and more powerful executive body, called the Council of Ministers (French: Conseil des ministres), is composed only of the senior ministers, though some Secretaries of State may attend Council meetings. The Council of Ministers is chaired by the President of the Republic, unlike the government, but is still led by the Prime Minister, who was officially titled as the President of the Council of Ministers (French: Président du Conseil des ministres) during the Third and Fourth Republics. By comparison, the Government of France is equivalent to Her Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom, whereas the Council of Ministers is equivalent to the Cabinet of the United Kingdom.