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The Collectio canonum quadripartita is an early medieval canon law collection, written around the year 850 in the ecclesiastical province of Reims. It consists of four books . The Quadripartita is an episcopal manual of canon and penitential law. It was a popular source for knowledge of penitential and canon law in France, England and Italy in the ninth and tenth centuries, notably influencing Regino's enormously important Libri duo de synodalibus causis . Even well into the thirteenth century the Quadripartita was being copied by scribes and quoted by canonists who were compiling their own collections of canon law.

Collectio canonum quadripartita
Stuttgart quadripartita 3vs.jpg
Folio 3v from the Stuttgart manuscript, showing the beginning of Book 1 of the Quadripartita
Also known as Quadripartitus
Language medieval Latin
Date ca. 850
Manuscript(s) nine
First printed edition no complete edition
Genre canon law collection
Subject penance, church discipline
Sources Collectiones Dacheriana and Remensis; Halitgar's penitential
Scale of justice
Part of a series on the
Jurisprudence of
Catholic canon law
046CupolaSPietro.jpg Catholicism portal

The Collectio canonum quadripartita (also known as the Collectio Vaticana or, more commonly, the Quadripartitus) is an early medieval canon law collection, written around the year 850 in the ecclesiastical province of Reims. It consists of four books (hence its modern name 'quadripartita', or 'four-parted'). The Quadripartita is an episcopal manual of canon and penitential law. It was a popular source for knowledge of penitential and canon law in France, England and Italy in the ninth and tenth centuries, notably influencing Regino's enormously important Libri duo de synodalibus causis ('Two books concerning diocesan affairs'). Even well into the thirteenth century the Quadripartita was being copied by scribes and quoted by canonists who were compiling their own collections of canon law.

This work should not be confused with the early twelfth-century Latin translation of Old English law known as the Quadripartitus.