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The ATP World Tour Finals is a professional men's tennis tournament played on indoor hard courts and is held annually in November at the O2 Arena in London, United Kingdom. The ATP World Tour Finals are the season-ending championships of the Association of Tennis Professionals World Tour, featuring the top eight singles players and doubles teams of the ATP Rankings. The tournament was first held in 1970. The current champions are Andy Murray in singles and Henri Kontinen / John Peers in doubles.

ATP World Tour Finals
Barclays ATP World Tour Finals logo.svg
Tournament information
Founded 1970; 46 years ago (1970)
Location London
United Kingdom (2009–2018)
Venue The O2 Arena
Category World Tour Finals
Surface Hard / indoors
Draw 8S / 8D
Prize money US$7,500,000
Website barclaysatpworldtourfinals.com
Current champions
Men's singles United Kingdom Andy Murray
Men's doubles Finland Henri Kontinen
Australia John Peers

The ATP World Tour Finals (also known as the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals for sponsorship reasons) is a professional men's tennis tournament played on indoor hard courts and is held annually in November at the O2 Arena in London, United Kingdom. The ATP World Tour Finals are the season-ending championships of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour, featuring the top eight singles players and doubles teams of the ATP Rankings. The tournament was first held in 1970. The current champions (2016) are Andy Murray in singles and Henri Kontinen / John Peers in doubles.

Unlike all other singles events on the men's tour, the ATP World Tour Finals is not a straightforward knock-out tournament. Eight players are divided into two groups of four and play three round-robin matches each against the other players in their group. The two players with the best records in each group progress to the semifinals, with the winners meeting in the final to determine the champion. Though it is theoretically possible to advance to the semi-finals of the tournament with two round-robin losses, no player in the history of the singles tournament has won the title after losing more than one round-robin match.

The current round robin format of two groups of four players progressing to a semifinal and final, has been in place for all editions of the tournament except the following years:

1970, 1971 – Round robin with no semifinals or finals, winner decided on best performed player

1982, 1983, 1984 – 12 player knock-out tournament with no round robin. The top four seeds in the event received a bye in the first round.

1985 – 16 player knock-out tournament with no round robin

In the current tournament, winners are awarded up to 1500 rankings points; with each round-robin loss, 200 points are deducted from that amount.