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Adenosine triphosphate is a nucleoside triphosphate a small molecule used in cells as a coenzyme. It is often referred to as the "molecular unit of currency" of intracellular energy transfer.

Adenosine triphosphate
Skeletal formula of ATP
Ball-and-stick model, based on x-ray diffraction data
Space-filling model with hydrogen atoms omitted
Identifiers
56-65-5
3D model (Jmol) Interactive image
Interactive image
ChEBI CHEBI:15422
ChEMBL ChEMBL14249
ChemSpider 5742
DrugBank DB00171
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.258
IUPHAR/BPS
1713
KEGG C00002
PubChem 5957
UNII 8L70Q75FXE
Properties
C10H16N5O13P3
Molar mass 507.18 g/mol
Density 1.04 g/cm (disodium salt)
Melting point 187 °C (369 °F; 460 K) disodium salt; decomposes
Acidity (pKa) 6.5
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
YesY verify (what is  ?)
Infobox references

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) a small molecule used in cells as a coenzyme. It is often referred to as the "molecular unit of currency" of intracellular energy transfer.

ATP transports chemical energy within cells for metabolism. Most cellular functions need energy in order to be carried out: synthesis of proteins, synthesis of membranes, movement of the cell, cellular division, etc. need energy to be performed. The ATP is the molecule that carries energy to the place where the energy is needed. When ATP breaks into ADP (Adenosine diphosphate) and Pi (phosphate), the breakdown of the last covalent link of phosphate (a simple -P04) liberates energy that is used in reactions where it is needed.

It is one of the end products of photophosphorylation, aerobic respiration, and fermentation, and is used by enzymes and structural proteins in many cellular processes, including biosynthetic reactions, motility, and cell division. One molecule of ATP contains adenine, ribose, and three phosphate groups, and it is produced by a wide variety of enzymes, including ATP synthase, from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and various phosphate group donors. Substrate-level phosphorylation, oxidative phosphorylation in cellular respiration, and photophosphorylation in photosynthesis are three major mechanisms of ATP biosynthesis.

Metabolic processes that use ATP as an energy source convert it back into its precursors. ATP is therefore continuously recycled in organisms: the human body, which on average contains only 250 grams (8.8 oz) of ATP, turns over its own body weight equivalent in ATP each day.

ATP is used as a substrate in signal transduction pathways by kinases that phosphorylate proteins and lipids. It is also used by adenylate cyclase, which uses ATP to produce the second messenger molecule cyclic AMP. The ratio between ATP and AMP is used as a way for a cell to sense how much energy is available and control the metabolic pathways that produce and consume ATP. Apart from its roles in signaling and energy metabolism, ATP is also incorporated into nucleic acids by polymerases in the process of transcription. ATP is the neurotransmitter believed to signal the sense of taste.

The structure of this molecule consists of a purine base (adenine) attached by the 9′ nitrogen atom to the 1′ carbon atom of a pentose sugar (ribose). Three phosphate groups are attached at the 5′ carbon atom of the pentose sugar. It is the addition and removal of these phosphate groups that inter-convert ATP, ADP and AMP. When ATP is used in DNA synthesis, the ribose sugar is first converted to deoxyribose by ribonucleotide reductase.

ATP was discovered in 1929 by Karl Lohmann, and independently by Cyrus Fiske and Yellapragada Subbarow of Harvard Medical School, but its correct structure was not determined until some years later. It was proposed to be the intermediary molecule between energy-yielding and energy-requiring reactions in cells by Fritz Albert Lipmann in 1941. It was first artificially synthesized by Alexander Todd in 1948.

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