WikiNow lets you discover the news you care about, follow the topics that matter to you and share your favourite stories with your friends.

© WikiNow

The 2003 invasion of Iraq lasted from 20 March to 1 May 2003 and signaled the start of the Iraq War, which was dubbed Operation Iraqi Freedom by the United States . The invasion consisted of 21 days of major combat operations, in which a combined force of troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Poland invaded Iraq and deposed the Ba'athist government of Saddam Hussein. The invasion phase consisted primarily of a conventionally fought war which included the capture of the Iraqi capital of Baghdad by American forces with the implicit assistance of the United Kingdom alongside Australia and Poland.

Belligerents

Coalition forces:
 United States
 United Kingdom
 Australia
 Poland


With military support from:
Iraqi National Congress
Iraqi Kurdistan Peshmerga

Iraq


Ansar al-Islam Commanders and leaders

United States George W. Bush
United States Tommy Franks
United Kingdom Tony Blair
United Kingdom Brian Burridge

Australia John Howard
Poland Leszek Miller

Masoud Barzani
Babakir Zebari
Jalal Talabani
Kosrat Rasul Ali
Ahmed Chalabi Iraq Saddam Hussein
Iraq Qusay Hussein
Iraq Uday Hussein
Iraq Abid Hamid Mahmud
Iraq Ali Hassan al-Majid
Iraq Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti
Iraq Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri
Iraq Ra'ad al-Hamdani
Abu Abdullah Warya Salih Shafi (Ansar-ul-Islam commander) Strength

380,000 troops

 United States: 192,000 troops
 United Kingdom: 45,000

 Australia: 2,000
 Poland: 194

Iraqi Kurdistan Peshmerga: 70,000

Iraqi National Congress: 620

Coat of arms (emblem) of Iraq 1991-2004.svg Iraqi Armed Forces: 375,000
Iraqi Republican Guard Symbol.svg Special Iraqi Republican Guard: 12,000
Iraqi Republican Guard Symbol.svg Iraqi Republican Guard: 70,000–75,000
Fedayeen Saddam SSI.svg Fedayeen Saddam: 30,000
Iraqi reserves: 650,000


Ansar al-Islam: 600–800 Casualties and losses

Coalition:
172 killed (139 U.S., 33 UK)
551 wounded (U.S.)
Peshmerga:
24+ killed

Total:
196+ killed

Estimated Iraqi combatant fatalities: 30,000 (figure attributed to General Tommy Franks)


7,600–11,000 (4,895–6,370 observed and reported) (Project on Defense Alternatives study)


13,500–45,000 (extrapolated from fatality rates in units serving around Baghdad)
Total: 7,600–45,000 killed

Estimated Iraqi civilian fatalities:
7,269 (Iraq Body Count)
3,200–4,300 (Project on Defense Alternatives study)

392,979 to 942,636 excess Iraqi deaths by June 2006 (Lancet Report)

48,000 to 751,000 excess Iraqi deaths by June 2011 (University Collaborative Iraq Mortality Study)

The 2003 invasion of Iraq lasted from 20 March to 1 May 2003 and signaled the start of the Iraq War, which was dubbed Operation Iraqi Freedom by the United States (prior to 19 March, the mission in Iraq was called Operation Enduring Freedom, a carryover from the War in Afghanistan). The invasion consisted of 21 days of major combat operations, in which a combined force of troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Poland invaded Iraq and deposed the Ba'athist government of Saddam Hussein. The invasion phase consisted primarily of a conventionally fought war which included the capture of the Iraqi capital of Baghdad by American forces with the implicit assistance of the United Kingdom alongside Australia and Poland.

160,000 troops were sent by the Coalition into Iraq, during the initial invasion phase, which lasted from 19 March to 9 April 2003. About 130,000 were sent from the USA alone, with about 28,000 British soldiers, Australia (2,000), and Poland (194). 36 other countries were involved in its aftermath. In preparation for the invasion, 100,000 U.S. troops were assembled in Kuwait by 18 February. The coalition forces also received support from Kurdish irregulars in Iraqi Kurdistan.

According to U.S. President George W. Bush and UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, the coalition mission was "to disarm Iraq of weapons of mass destruction, to end Saddam Hussein's support for terrorism, and to free the Iraqi people." Others place a much greater emphasis on the impact of the 11 September 2001 attacks, and the role this played in changing U.S. strategic calculations, and the rise of the freedom agenda. According to Blair, the trigger was Iraq's failure to take a "final opportunity" to disarm itself of alleged nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons that U.S. and British officials called an immediate and intolerable threat to world peace.

In a January 2003 CBS poll, 64% of Americans had approved of military action against Iraq; however, 63% wanted Bush to find a diplomatic solution rather than go to war, and 62% believed the threat of terrorism directed against the U.S. would increase due to war. The invasion of Iraq was strongly opposed by some long-standing U.S. allies, including the governments of France, Germany, and New Zealand. Their leaders argued that there was no evidence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and that invading the country was not justified in the context of UNMOVIC's 12 February 2003 report. On 15 February 2003, a month before the invasion, there were worldwide protests against the Iraq War, including a rally of three million people in Rome, which is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the largest ever anti-war rally. According to the French academic Dominique Reynié, between 3 January and 12 April 2003, 36 million people across the globe took part in almost 3,000 protests against the Iraq war.

The invasion was preceded by an airstrike on the Presidential Palace in Baghdad on 20 March 2003. The following day, coalition forces launched an incursion into Basra Province from their massing point close to the Iraqi-Kuwaiti border. While the special forces launched an amphibious assault from the Persian Gulf to secure Basra and the surrounding petroleum fields, the main invasion army moved into southern Iraq, occupying the region and engaging in the Battle of Nasiriyah on 23 March. Massive air strikes across the country and against Iraqi command and control threw the defending army into chaos and prevented an effective resistance. On 26 March, the 173rd Airborne Brigade was airdropped near the northern city of Kirkuk, where they joined forces with Kurdish rebels and fought several actions against the Iraqi Army to secure the northern part of the country.

The main body of coalition forces continued their drive into the heart of Iraq and met with little resistance. Most of the Iraqi military was quickly defeated and Baghdad was occupied on 9 April. Other operations occurred against pockets of the Iraqi army, including the capture and occupation of Kirkuk on 10 April, and the attack and capture of Tikrit on 15 April. Iraqi president Saddam Hussein and the central leadership went into hiding as the coalition forces completed the occupation of the country. On 1 May, an end of major combat operations was declared, ending the invasion period and beginning the military occupation period.