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The 1964 Rameswaram cyclone was regarded as one of the most powerful storms to ever strike Sri Lanka on record. The system was first identified as an area of low pressure over the Andaman Sea on December 15. Following interaction with a tropical wave, it began to develop and became a depression by December 18. Increasingly rapid intensification ensued over the following days with the cyclone attaining hurricane-force winds around 5°N the next day. Early on December 23, the storm struck Ceylon near Pamban Island with winds estimated at 240 km/h , ranking it as a modern-day super cyclonic storm. Weakening somewhat, the storm soon struck Tamil Nadu. Rapid weakening followed once the cyclone was onshore and it degenerated into a depression on December 24 as it emerged over the Arabian Sea. The system later dissipated on December 26 over open waters.

1964 Rameswaram Cyclone
Super cyclonic storm (IMD scale)
1964 Dhanushkodi cyclone.png
Satellite image of the cyclone on December 21
Formed December 18, 1964
Dissipated December 26, 1964
Highest winds 240 km/h (150 mph)
280 km/h (175 mph)
Lowest pressure ≤ 970 hPa (mbar); 28.64 inHg
Fatalities At least 1,800 total
Damage $150 million (1964 USD)
Areas affected Ceylon, India
Part of the 1964 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

The 1964 Rameswaram cyclone (also known as the Dhanushkodi cyclone) was regarded as one of the most powerful storms to ever strike Sri Lanka (known then as Ceylon) on record. The system was first identified as an area of low pressure over the Andaman Sea on December 15. Following interaction with a tropical wave, it began to develop and became a depression by December 18. Increasingly rapid intensification ensued over the following days with the cyclone attaining hurricane-force winds around 5°N the next day. Early on December 23, the storm struck Ceylon near Pamban Island with winds estimated at 240 km/h (150 mph), ranking it as a modern-day super cyclonic storm. Weakening somewhat, the storm soon struck Tamil Nadu. Rapid weakening followed once the cyclone was onshore and it degenerated into a depression on December 24 as it emerged over the Arabian Sea. The system later dissipated on December 26 over open waters.